Showing posts with label Pakistan Army Assault Rifles. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Pakistan Army Assault Rifles. Show all posts

Friday, July 4, 2014

Heckler & Koch MP5 Of Pakistan Army

The Heckler & Koch MP5 (from German: Maschinenpistole 5, "machine pistol model 5") is a 9mm submachine gun of German design, developed in the 1960s by a team of engineers from the German small arms manufacturer Heckler & Koch GmbH (H&K) of Oberndorf am Neckar. There are over 100 variants of the MP5, including a semi-automatic version. The MP5 is one of the most widely used submachine guns in the world, having been adopted by 40 nations and numerous military, law enforcement, intelligence, and security organizations. In the 1990s, Heckler & Koch developed the Heckler & Koch UMP, the MP5's successor; both are available as of 2014.
Design Specifications :-
The primary version of the MP5 family is the MP5A2, which is a lightweight, air-cooled, selective fire delayed blowback operated 9×19mm Parabellum weapon with a roller-delayed bolt. It fires from a closed bolt (bolt forward) position. The fixed, free floating, cold hammer-forged barrel has 6 right-hand grooves with a 1 in 250 mm (1:10 in) rifling twist rate and is pressed and pinned into the receiver.
Features :-
The first MP5 models used a double-column straight box magazine, but since 1977, slightly curved, steel magazines are used with a 15-round capacity (weighing 0.12 kg) or a 30-round capacity (0.17 kg empty).
The adjustable iron sights (closed type) consist of a rotating rear diopter drum and a front post installed in a hooded ring. The rear sight is adjustable for both windage and elevation with the use of a special tool, being adjusted at the factory for firing at 25m with standard 124 grains FMJ 9x19mm NATO ammunition; the drum provides four different apertures of varying width used to adjust the light entrance in the diopter system, according to the user's eye relief and tactical situation, and not for firing at 25, 50, 75 and 100m as some people wrongly imagine.
The MP5 has a hammer firing mechanism. The trigger group is housed inside an interchangeable polymer trigger module (with an integrated pistol grip) and equipped with a three-position fire mode selector that serves as the manual safety toggle. The “S” or Sicher position in white denotes weapon safe, “E” or Einzelfeuer in red represents single fire, and “F” or FeuerstoƟ (also marked in red) designates continuous fire. The SEF symbols appear on both sides of the plastic trigger group. The selector lever is actuated with the thumb of the shooting hand and is located only on the left side of the original SEF trigger group or on both sides of the ambidextrous trigger groups. The safety/selector is rotated into the various firing settings or safety position by depressing the tail end of the lever. Tactile clicks (stops) are present at each position to provide a positive stop and prevent inadvertent rotation. The "safe" setting disables the trigger by blocking the hammer release with a solid section of the safety axle located inside the trigger housing.
The non-reciprocating cocking handle is located above the handguard and protrudes from the cocking handle tube at approximately a 45° angle. This rigid control is attached to a tubular piece within the cocking lever housing called the cocking lever support, which in turn, makes contact with the forward extension of the bolt group. It is not however connected to the bolt carrier and therefore cannot be used as a forward assist to fully seat the bolt group. The cocking handle is held in a forward position by a spring detent located in the front end of the cocking lever support which engages in the cocking lever housing. The lever is locked back by pulling it fully to the rear and rotating it slightly clockwise where it can be hooked into an indent in the cocking lever tube.
Operating Mechanism Details :-
The bolt rigidly engages the barrel extension a cylindrical component welded to the receiver into which the barrel is pinned. The delay mechanism is of the same design as that used in the G3 rifle. The two-part bolt consists of a bolt head with rollers and a bolt carrier. The heavier bolt carrier lies up against the bolt head when the weapon is ready to fire and inclined planes on the front locking piece lie between the rollers and force them out into recesses in the barrel extension.
Heckler & Koch MP5 Of Pakistan Army
Heckler & Koch MP5 Of Pakistan Army
When fired, expanding propellant gases produced from the burning powder in the cartridge exert rearward pressure on the bolt head transferred through the base of the cartridge case as it is propelled out of the chamber. A portion of this force is transmitted through the rollers projecting from the bolt head, which are cammed inward against the inclined flanks of the locking recesses in the barrel extension and to the angled shoulders of the locking piece. The selected angles of the recesses and the incline on the locking piece produce a velocity ratio of about 4:1 between the bolt carrier and the bolt head. This results in a calculated delay, allowing the projectile to exit the barrel and gas pressure to drop to a safe level before the case is extracted from the chamber.
The delay results from the amount of time it takes for enough recoil energy to be transferred through to the bolt carrier in a sufficient quantity for it to be driven to the rear against the force of inertia of the bolt carrier and the forward pressure exerted against the bolt by the recoil spring. As the rollers are forced inward they displace the locking piece and propel the bolt carrier to the rear. The bolt carrier's rearward velocity is four times that of the bolt head since the cartridge remains in the chamber for a short period of time during the initial recoil impulse. After the bolt carrier has traveled rearward 4 mm, the locking piece is withdrawn fully from the bolt head and the rollers are compressed into the bolt head. Only once the locking rollers are fully cammed into the bolt head can the entire bolt group continue its rearward movement in the receiver, breaking the seal in the chamber and continuing the feeding cycle.
Since the 9×19mm Parabellum cartridge is relatively low powered, the bolt does not have an anti-bounce device like the G3, but instead the bolt carrier contains tungsten granules that prevent the bolt group from bouncing back after impacting the barrel extension. The weapon has a fluted chamber that enhances extraction reliability by bleeding gases backwards into the shallow flutes running along the length of the chamber to prevent the cartridge case from expanding and sticking to the chamber walls (since the bolt is opened under relatively high barrel pressure). A spring extractor is installed inside the bolt head and holds the case securely until it strikes the ejector arm and is thrown out of the ejection port to the right of the receiver. The lever-type ejector is located inside the trigger housing (activated by the movement of the recoiling bolt).
Manufactured And Used By Pakistan Army :-
Pakistan ordinance factories make this weapon under license. This fast submachine gun is used special services group and some other law enforcement agencies inside pakistan. This weapon is used globally for the protection details of VIPs’. Pakistan Manufactures the MP5A2, MP5P3 (MP5A3), MP5P4 (MP5A4), MP5P5 (MP5A5) and SMG PK (MP5K). The SMG PK-1 is an MP5K clone with a short retractable stock.

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Special Services Group Of Pakistan Army

The Special Services Group (SSG) is a special operations force of the Pakistan Army. It is quite similar to the U.S. Army's Special Forces and the British Army's SAS. The SSG, headquartered at Tarbela, is headed by a Major-General and divided into ten battalions, the actual strength of which is classified.
Training :-
Special Services Group Of Pakistan Army Insignia
Special Services Group Of Pakistan Army
Insignia
SSG officers must have at least five years of prior military experience and volunteer from other formations for two-year assignments with the SSG; non-commissioned officers and enlisted men volunteer from other formations to serve permanently in the SSG. All trainees must participate in a nine-month SSG course at Cherat. The SSG course emphasizes physical conditioning, including a 36-mile march in 12 hours and a five-mile run in 20 minutes with full gear. Following the SSG course, trainees must go through the airborne training to get their commando wings from the SSG Airborne School. The course lasts four weeks, with wings awarded after five day-jumps and three night-jumps. The SSG recruits get trained in hand-to-hand combat training and very hard physical fitness training; only about 25% of recruits make it through to the Pakistan SSG due to the very tough training course.
Uniform :-
The commandos are distinguished by their insignia of maroon berets, a common color for airborne troops, with a silver metal tab on a light blue felt square with a dagger and lightning bolts, and a wing on the right side of the chest. The combat uniform of the SSG is similar to the US woodland pattern camouflage coat and pants. Other uniforms include camouflage and black dungarees (for the CT team). 
Equipment :-
The SSG is equipped with an array of modern weaponry which includes, Steyr AUG, SIG 552 LR, HK G3, and Chinese Type-81/56 rifles, Colt M4 carbines, and FN P90 and HK-MP5 Submachine guns (many different variants). Light machine gun in use is Rheinmetall MG3 (locally produced along with HK G3s and MP5s). In sniper or Marksman role, the SSG CT (Counter-Terrorism) teams are equipped with Barrett M82, Finnish Tikka bolt-action rifles, Steyr sniper SSG 69, POF Eye Corner shot gun and HK PSG1 and Dragunov SVD Semi-automatic rifles. Pistols include various Heckler & K
och & Glock models.
Organisation :-
Pakistani special forces have 10 battalions
- 1st Commando Yaldrum Battalion
- 2nd Commando Rahbar Battalion
- 3rd Commando Powindahs Battalion
- 4th Commando Yalghar Battalion
- 5th Commando Zilzaal Battalion
- 6th Commando AL Samsaam Battalion
- 7th Commando Babrum Battalion
Each battalion consists of 700 men in four companies, with each company split into platoons and then into 10-man teams. Battalions are commanded by Lieutenant Colonels.
Plus three independent commando companies :
- Musa Company - Specializes in Amphibious Operations
- Zarrar Company - Specializes in Counter-terrorism

Friday, April 11, 2014

Standard Rifle Of Pakistan Army | The G3 Assault Rifle

Standard Rifle Of Pakistan Army | The G3 Assault Rifle
Standard Rifle Of Pakistan Army | The G3 Assault Rifle With Knife
The G3 is a 7.62×51mm NATO battle rifle developed in the 1950s by the German armament manufacturer Heckler & Koch GmbH (H&K) in collaboration with the Spanish state-owned design and development agency CETME.

The G3A3 (A4) is a selective-fire automatic weapon that employs a roller-delayed blowback operating system. The two-piece bolt assembly consists of a breech (bolt head) and bolt carrier. The bolt is held in battery by two sliding cylindrical rollers that engage locking recesses in the barrel extension (popularly called a "trunnion"; BATF calls this a "mounting block"). The breech is opened when both rollers are compressed inward against camming surfaces driven by the rearward pressure of the expanding gases upon the bolt head. As the rollers move inward, recoil energy is transferred to the locking piece and bolt carrier which begin to withdraw while the bolt head slowly moves rearward in relation to the bolt carrier. As the bolt carrier clears the rollers, pressure in the bore drops to a safe level, the bolt head is caught by the bolt carrier and moves to the rear as one unit, continuing the operating cycle.
The firearm is equipped with iron sights that consist of a rotary rear drum and hooded front post. The rear sight, mechanically adjustable for both windage and elevation, has an open notch used to fire up to 100 m and three apertures used for: 200, 300 and 400 m. The receiver housing has recesses that work with HK clamp adapters used to mount day or night optics.

In Use Of Pakistan Army :-
Standard Rifle Of Pakistan Army | The G3 Assault Rifle Sniper Varient
Standard Rifle Of Pakistan Army | The G3 Assault Rifle Sniper Varient
Many people ask questions that why Pakistani army uses this old rifle and large caliber. The answer lies in the very detailed specifications of this gun. The gun is designed for medium ranged combats and is very effective against targets at 500 meters. This gun can penetrate brick walls and bunker walls without concrete and Level 3 body armour. As you may know that most of the armed forces of our arch enemy Hindustan use level 3 body armour, therefore this gun is very useful for penetrating this  kind of armour and breaching bunker walls at long ranges. Also it can also be converted in a sniper rifle with small modifications and serve as a general purpose sniper rifle. The rate of fire is extremely fast. There are two types of magazines. Other specifications are given below.

Specifications :-
Weight
▪ 4.1 kg (9.04 lb) (G3A3)
▪ 4.7 kg (10 lb) (G3A4)
▪ 5.54 kg (12.2 lb) with optic (G3SG/1)
▪ 4.1 kg (9.0 lb) (G3K)
Length
▪ 1,025 mm (40.4 in) (G3A3)
▪ 1,025 mm (40.4 in) stock extended / 840 mm
▪ (33.1 in) stock collapsed (G3A4)
▪ 1,025 mm (40.4 in) (G3SG/1)
▪ 895 mm (35.2 in) stock extended / 711 mm (28.0 in) stock collapsed (G3K)
Barrel length
▪ 450 mm (17.7 in)
▪ 315 mm (12.4 in) (G3K)
Cartridge
▪ 7.62×51mm NATO
Action
▪ Roller-delayed blowback
Rate of fire
▪ 500–600 rounds/min
Muzzle velocity
▪ 800 m/s (2,625 ft/s)
Effective firing range
▪ 500 meters (550 yd), 100–400 m sight adjustments
Feed system
▪ 20-round detachable box
▪ 50-round drum magazine
Sights
▪ Rear: rotary diopter; front: hooded post