Showing posts with label Pakistan Weapon Systems. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Pakistan Weapon Systems. Show all posts

Friday, October 24, 2014

Nuclear Weapons Program Of Pakistan Introuction

Nuclear Weapons Program Of Pakistan
Nuclear Weapons Program Of Pakistan
Pakistan began focusing on nuclear weapons development in January 1972 under the leadership of Prime Minister Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto, who delegated the program to the Chairman of PAEC Munir Ahmad Khan. In 1976, Abdul Qadeer Khan also joined the nuclear weapons program, and, with Zahid Ali Akbar, headed the Kahuta Project, while the rest of the program being run in PAEC and comprising over twenty laboratories and projects was headed by nuclear engineer, Munir Ahmad Khan. This program would reach fruition under President General Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq, then-Chief of Army Staff. Pakistan's nuclear weapons development was in response to neighboring India's development of its nuclear programme. Bhutto called a meeting of senior scientists and engineers on 20 January 1972, in Multan, which came to known as "Multan meeting". Bhutto was the main architect of this programme and it was here that Bhutto orchestrated nuclear weapons programme and rallied Pakistan's academic scientists to build the atomic bomb for national survival. At the Multan meeting, Bhutto also appointed Munir Ahmad Khan as chairman of Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC), who, until then, had been working as Director at the nuclear power and Reactor Division of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), in Vienna, Austria. In December 1972, Abdus Salam led the establishment of Theoretical Physics Group (TPG) as he called scientists working at ICTP to report to Munir Ahmad Khan. This marked the beginning of Pakistan's pursuit of nuclear deterrence capability. Following India's surprise nuclear test, codenamed Smiling Buddha in 1974, the first confirmed nuclear test by a nation outside the permanent five members of the United Nations Security Council, the goal to develop nuclear weapons received considerable impetus.

Friday, July 25, 2014

Safety Level Of Pakistani Nuclear Arsenal

INDIA'S explosion of its nuclear device in 1974 drew only a customary “show of concern” from the western powers. But Pakistan's nuclear program, initiated in response to the Indian acquisition of nuclear weapons, evoked immediate and “serious concern” from the same quarters. Ever since, Pakistan has been under immense pressure to scrap its program while the Indians remain uncensored.

That western attitude was discriminatory can also be seen by the religious colour it gave to Pakistan's bomb by calling it an 'Islamic bomb'. One has never heard of the Israeli bomb being called a 'Jewish Bomb', or the Indian bomb a 'Hindu Bomb', or the American and British bomb a 'Christian Bomb' or the Soviet bomb a 'Communist' (or an 'Atheist) Bomb'. The West simply used Pakistan's bomb to make Islam synonymous with aggression and make its nuclear program a legitimate target, knowing full well that it merely served a defensive purpose and was not even remotely associated with Islam.
Main Battle Tanks Developed By Pakistan
With India going nuclear soon after playing a crucial role in dismembering Pakistan in 1971 and enjoying an overwhelming conventional military superiority over Pakistan in the ratio of 41, a resource strapped Pakistan was pushed to the wall. Left with no other choice but to develop a nuclear deterrent to ward off future Indian threats, Prime Minister Zulfikar Ali Bhutto declared “Pakistanis will eat grass but make a nuclear bomb”. And sure enough, they did it. Soon, however, both he and the nuclear program were to become non-grata. Amid intense pressure, sanctions and vilification campaign, Henry Kissinger personally delivered to a defiant Bhutto the American threat “give up your nuclear program or else we will make a horrible example of you'.
And a horrible example was made of Bhutto for his defiance. But he had enabled Pakistan to become the 7th nuclear power in the world. This served Pakistan well. India was kept at bay despite temptations for military adventurism. Although there has never been real peace in South Asia, at least there has been no war since 1971.
Ignoring its security perspective, Pakistan's western 'friends' refused to admit it to their exclusive nuclear club, though expediency made them ignore its 'crime' when it suited their purpose. But driven by identical geo-strategic interests in their respective regions and seeing Pakistan as an obstacle to their designs, Israel and India missed no opportunity to malign or subvert Pakistan's program.
Due to its defiance of Indian diktat, Pakistan is for India an obstruction in its quest for domination of South Asia and the Indian Ocean region. Israel's apprehension of Pakistan's military prowess is rooted in the strength Pakistan indirectly provides to Arab states with whom Israel has remained in a state of conflict. Conscious that several Arab states look up to Pakistan for military support in the event of threat to their security from Israel, it is unsettling for Israel to see a nuclear armed Pakistan.
Israel can also not overlook the fact that Pakistan's military is a match to its own. The PAF pilots surprised Israeli Air Force, when flying mostly Russian aircraft they shot down several relatively superior Israeli aircraft in air combat in the 1973 Arab-Israel war, shattering the invincibility myth of Israeli pilots who believed themselves to be too superior in skill and technology. The Pakistanis happened to be assigned to Jordanian, Syrian and Iraqi air forces on training missions when the war broke out and, unknown to the Israelis then, they incognito undertook combat missions.
Ballistic Missile And Guided Missile Systems Developed By Pakistan
Ballistic Missile And Guided Missile Systems Developed By Pakistan
After successfully destroying Iraqi nuclear reactor in 1981, Israelis planned a similar attack on Pakistan's nuclear facilities at Kahuta in collusion with India in the 1980s. Using satellite pictures and intelligence information, Israel reportedly built a full-scale mock-up of Kahuta facility in the Negev Desert where pilots of F-16 and F-15 squadrons practiced mock attacks.
According to 'The Asian Age', journalists Adrian Levy and Catherine Scott-Clark stated in their book 'Deception Pakistan, the US and the Global Weapons Conspiracy', that Israeli Air Force was to launch an air attack on Kahuta in mid-1980s from Jamnagar airfield in Gujarat (India). The book claims that “in March 1984, Prime Minister Indira Gandhi signed off (on) the Israeli-led operation bringing India, Pakistan and Israel to within a hair's breadth of a nuclear conflagration”.
Another report claims that Israel also planned an air strike directly out of Israel. After midway and midair refueling, Israeli warplanes planned to shoot down a commercial airline's flight over Indian Ocean that flew into Islamabad early morning, fly in a tight formation to appear as one large aircraft on radar screens preventing detection, use the drowned airliner's call sign to enter Islamabad's air space, knock out Kahuta and fly out to Jammu to refuel and exit.
According to reliable reports in mid-1980s this mission was actually launched one night. But the Israelis were in for a big surprise. They discovered that Pakistan Air Force had already sounded an alert and had taken to the skies in anticipation of this attack. The mission had to be hurriedly aborted.
Pakistan reminded the Israelis that Pakistan was no Iraq and that PAF was no Iraqi Air Force. Pakistan is reported to have conveyed that an attack on Kahuta would force Pakistan to lay waste to Dimona, Israel's nuclear reactor in the Negev Desert. India was also warned that Islamabad would attack Trombay if Kahuta facilities were hit.
The above quoted book claims that “Prime Minister Indira Gandhi eventually aborted the operation despite protests from military planners in New Delhi and Jerusalem.”
McNair's paper #41 published by USAF Air University (India Thwarts Israeli Destruction of Pakistan's "Islamic Bomb") also confirmed this plan. It said, “Israeli interest in destroying Pakistan's Kahuta reactor to scuttle the "Islamic bomb" was blocked by India's refusal to grant landing and refueling rights to Israeli warplanes in 1982.” Clearly India wanted to see Kahuta gone but did not want to face retaliation at the hands of the PAF. Israel, on its part wanted this to be a joint Indo-Israeli strike to avoid being solely held responsible.
The Reagan administration also hesitated to support the plan because Pakistan's distraction at that juncture would have hurt American interests in Afghanistan, when Pakistan was steering the Afghan resistance against the Soviets.
Although plans to hit Kahuta were shelved, the diatribe against Pakistan's nuclear program continued unabated. Israel used its control over the American political establishment and western media to create hysteria. India worked extensively to promote paranoia, branding Pakistan's program as unsafe, insecure and a threat to peace. The fact is otherwise. It is technically sounder, safer and more secure than that of India and has ensured absence of war in the region.
Pakistan Air Force Jets
Pakistan Air Force Jets
The US invasion of Afghanistan provided another opening for Indo-Israeli nexus to target Pakistan's strategic assets. This time the strategy was to present Pakistan as an unstable state, incapable of defending itself against religious extremist insurgents, creating the specter of Islamabad and its nuclear assets falling in their hands. Suggestions are being floated that Pakistan being at risk of succumbing to extremists, its nuclear assets should be disabled, seized or forcibly taken out by the US. Alternatively, an international agency should take them over for safe keeping.
Pakistan has determinedly thwarted the terrorist threat and foiled this grand conspiracy. Pakistan has made it clear that it would act decisively against any attempt by any quarter to harm its nuclear assets. But if the game is taken to the next level, the consequences would be disastrous for the region.
The Indo-Israeli nexus is losing initiative. But as long as the American umbrella is available Afghanistan will remain a playground for mischief mongers. It is now up to the US to walk its talk and prove its claim that it wants to see a secure and stable Pakistan. It must pull the plug on conspiracies to destabilize Pakistan.

Sunday, May 18, 2014

Dragunov Sniper Weapon System Of Pakistan Army

Dragunov Sniper Weapon System Of Pakistan Army
Dragunov Sniper Weapon System Of Pakistan Army

The Dragunov is a semi-automatic gas-operated rifle with a short-stroke gas-piston system. The barrel breech is locked through a rotating bolt (left rotation) and uses three locking lugs to engage corresponding locking recesses in the barrel extension. The rifle has a manual, two-position gas regulator. After discharging the last cartridge from the magazine, the bolt carrier and bolt are held back on a bolt catch that is released by pulling the cocking handle to the rear. The rifle has a hammer-type striking mechanism and a manual lever safety selector. The firing pin is a "free-floating" type and, as a result, some soft-primered ammunition had the reputation of causing a "slam fire" event. Thus, military grade ammunition with primers confirmed to be properly seated is recommended for the Dragunov and its variants. This appears to have solved the "slam fire" issue. The rifle's receiver is machined to provide additional accuracy and torsional strength. The Dragunov's receiver bears a number of similarities to the AK action, such as the large dust cover, iron sights and lever safety selector, but these similarities are primarily cosmetic in nature.


Different Variant Of Dragunov Sniper Weapon System Of Pakistan Army
Different Variant Of Dragunov Sniper Weapon System Of Pakistan Army
For precision shooting, specifically designed sniper cartridges are used, developed by V. M. Sabelnikov, P. P. Sazonov and V. M. Dvorianinov. The proprietary 7N1 load has a steel jacketed projectile with an air pocket, a steel core and a lead knocker in the base for maximum terminal effect. The 7N1 was replaced in 1999 by the 7N14 round. The 7N14 is a new load developed for the SVD. It consists of a 151 grain projectile that travels at the same 830 m/s, but it has a sharp hardened steel core projectile. The rifle can also fire standard 7.62×54mmR ammunition with either conventional, tracer or armor piercing incendiary rounds.
Use By Pakistan Army :-
This Sniper Rifle is still in use by Pakistan army and its special services group along with other assault rifles and sniper rifles. but now Pakistan army is rapidly increasing its sniper units and arming them with latest high powered .50 cal sniper rifles which are the latest and most powerful sniper rifles at this time.
Other specifications of this sniper rifle are given below.

Specifications Of Dragunov Sniper Rifle :-
▪ 4.30 kg (9.48 lb) (with scope and unloaded magazine)
▪ 4.68 kg (10.3 lb) (SVDS)
▪ 4.40 kg (9.7 lb) (SVU)
▪ 5.02 kg (11.1 lb) (SWD-M)
Reticle Of Scope Of Dragunov Sniper Weapon System Of Pakistan Army
▪ 1,225 mm (48.2 in) (SVD)
▪ 1,135 mm (44.7 in) stock extended / ▪ 815 mm (32.1 in) stock folded (SVDS)
▪ 900 mm (35.4 in) (SVU)
▪ 1,125 mm (44.3 in) (SWD-M)
Barrel Length
▪ 620 mm (24.4 in) (SVD, SWD-M)
▪ 565 mm (22.2 in) (SVDS)
▪ 600 mm (23.6 in) (SVU)
▪ 7.62×54mmR
▪ Gas-operated, rotating bolt
Rate Of Fire
▪ 30 rounds/min
Muzzle Velocity
▪ 830 m/s (2,723 ft/s) (SVD)
▪ 810 m/s (2,657.5 ft/s) (SVDS)
▪ 800 m/s (2,624.7 ft/s) (SVU)
Effective Firing Range
▪ 800 m (875 yd)
Feed System
▪ 10-round detachable box magazine
▪ PSO-1 telescopic sight and iron sights with an adjustable rear notch sight

Thursday, May 8, 2014

Army Air Defense Command Of Pakistan Army

The Pakistan Army Air Defense Command is an active military administrative combatant staff corps of the Pakistan Army and a major combative formation tasked with air defenses of the country from the foreign threats. The Corps is stationed and headquartered at the Chaklala Army Cantonment in Rawalpindi, Punjab Province of Pakistan. The command was formed after military exercise when the Pakistani military learned of its weakness in providing air cover to a moving battlefield. It consists of a total of five military divisions; one tasked with air defense of the northern region of Pakistan and the other with the southern region. Army Air Defense has its own school named as School of Army Air Defense (SAAD).
Army Air Defense Command Of Pakistan Army
Pakistan Army Air Defense Missile Approaching Target

Wednesday, May 7, 2014

Al-Zarrar Tank Of Pakistan Army

Al-Zarrar Tank Of Pakistan Army
Al-Zarrar Tank Of Pakistan Army
During a Demonstrtion
The Al-Zarrar is a modern main battle tank (MBT) developed and manufactured by Heavy Industries Taxila (HIT) of Pakistan for the Pakistan Army. The KMDB design bureau of Ukraine also took part in the development project. A re-built, upgraded variant of the Chinese Type 59 tank, Al-Zarrar is supposed to be a cost-effective replacement for the Type 59 fleet of the Pakistan Army. Equipped with modern armament, fire control and ballistic protection, the Al-Zarrar upgrade is also offered by HIT to the armies of foreign countries to upgrade their T-54/T-55 or Type 59 tanks to Al-Zarrar standard. 54 modifications made to the Type 59 make the Al-Zarrar effectively a new tank. The Al-Zarrar development program started in 1990 and the first batch of 80 upgraded tanks were delivered to the Pakistan Army on 26 February 2004.

History :-
It was decided by the Pakistan Army that their inventory of Chinese origin Type 59 tanks was too large to be discarded and replaced, so a phased upgrade program was started by Heavy Industries Taxila (HIT) in 1990. The idea was to upgrade the firepower, mobility and protection of the Type 59 to allow it to compete on the modern battlefield at a fraction of the cost of a modern main battle tank (MBT). The first phase of the upgrade program was completed in 1997. The second phase started in 1998 when HIT began development and testing of a new tank, a Type 59 re-built with over 50 modifications, resulting in three prototypes with slightly differing specifications (different fire-control systems, for example). Many systems originally developed for HIT's Al-Khalid MBT were incorporated. The prototypes underwent extensive testing by HIT and the Pakistan Army, who selected the final version of the tank, dubbed Al-Zarrar. HIT began full production of Al-Zarrar during May 2003 under a renowned Project Manager Mahmood Khan.
Design Specifications Of Al Zarrar Tank :-
Armament And Fire Control :-
Al-Zarrar's primary armament is a 125 mm smoothbore tank gun with an autofrettaged, chrome-plated gun barrel. It is capable of firing APFSDS, HEAT-FS and HE-FS rounds as well as anti-tank guided missiles and a Pakistani DU (depleted uranium) round, the 125 mm Naiza. Naiza is capable of penetrating 550 mm of RHA armour at a distance of 2 km. Reloaded by a semi-automatic auto loader, the gun has a dual-axis stabilization system and thermal imaging sights for the commander and gunner. Integrated into the fire-control system. The image stabilized fire-control system includes a laser range-finder for accurate range information and ballistics computer to improve accuracy. An improved gun control system is also fitted. The secondary armament consists of an external 12.7 mm anti-aircraft machine gun mounted on the roof of the turret, which can be aimed and fired from inside the tank, and a 7.62 mm coaxial machine gun.
Al-Zarrar Tank Of Pakistan Army
Al-Zarrar MBTs Of The Pakistan Army's
27th Cavalry Regiment Stationed At Kharian.
Mobility and Protection :-
The Al-Zarrar is powered by a liquid-cooled 12-cylinder diesel engine, giving a power output of 730 hp (540 kW) and torque output of 305 kg.m at 1300–1400 rpm. A combat weight of 40 tonnes gives Al-Zarrar a power-to-weight ratio of 18.3 hp/tonne and a top speed of 65 km/h. Crew comfort is improved over the Type 59 by a modified torsion bar suspension system.
Al-Zarrar uses modular composite armor and explosive reactive armor to give improved protection from anti-tank missiles, mines and other weapons. The Pakistani ATCOP LTS-1 laser threat warning system is fitted to inform the tank crew if the tank is targeted by a laser range-finder or laser designator. Smoke grenade launchers are fitted to the sides of the turret. An automatic fire-extinguishing and explosion suppression system is installed to improve crew survivability.

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

JF-17 Thunder Of Pakistan Airforce (PAF)

JF-17 Thunder Of Pakistan Airforce (PAF)
JF-17 Thunder Of Pakistan Airforce (PAF)
The JF-17 can carry a variety of missiles and bombs, including air-to-air and air-to-surface missiles, supplemented by a 23/30 mm GSh-23-2 twin-barrel auto cannon. It is powered by a RD-93 afterburning turbofan, and has a top speed of Mach 1.6. The JF-17 is slated to become the "mid-tech" backbone of Pakistan Air Force (Pakistan Air Force), complementing the few "high-tech" surplus F-16s with the J-10Bs order delayed indefinitely. The JF-17 is expected to fill the duties of aerial reconnaissance, ground-attack and interception.

Pakistan Air Force has already started induction, and has plans to induct around 250 units. The JF-17 will replace Pakistan's ageing fleet of A-5C, Mirage-III, Mirage-V, and F-7P/PG by 2015.
The software written for the Pakistan Air Force JF-17's avionics totals more than one million lines of instructions, incorporating the concept of open architecture. Rather than using the Ada programming language, which is specially optimized for military applications, the software is written using the popular civilian C++ programming language to better use the large number of civilian software programmers available. The redesigned PT-04 prototype JF-17 had more advanced avionics than its predecessors, which are included on the production version of the Pakistan Air Force jets.
The communication systems of Pakistan Air Force comprise two VHF/UHF radios, one of them having capacity for data linking. The data link can be used to exchange data with ground control centers, airborne early warning and control aircraft and other combat aircraft also equipped with compatible data links. Using this ability of data linking it can also communicate with recently inducted state of the art main battle tank Al Khalid Tank in Pakistan army. The ability to data link with other "nodes" such as aircraft and ground stations allows JF-17 to become part of a network, improving the situational awareness of the pilot and other entities in the network. Data linking is an essential part of the main battle systems. Modern warfare is solely based on effective co-ordination between different armed forces. Therefore this system is very useful for today’s battle ground.
Cockpit Of JF-17 Thunder Of Pakistan Airforce (PAF)
Cockpit Of JF-17 Thunder Of Pakistan Airforce (PAF)

The JF-17 has a defensive aids system (DAS) made up of various integrated sub-systems. A radar warning receiver (RWR) gives data such as direction and proximity of enemy radars to the pilot and electronic warfare (EW) suite, housed in a fairing at the tip of the tail fin for greater coverage that interferes with enemy radars. The EW suite is also linked to a Missile Approach Warning (MAW) system to help it defend against radar-guided missiles. The MAW system uses several optical sensors mounted on the airframe (two of which can be seen at the base of the vertical stabilizer) that detect the rocket motors of missiles and gives 360 degree coverage. Data collected by the MAW system, such as direction of inbound missiles and the time to impact, is also shown on the cockpit displays and HUD to warn the pilot. A counter-measures dispensing system releases decoy flares and chaff to help the aircraft evade enemy radars and missiles. The DAS systems will also be enhanced by integration of a self-protection radar jamming pod which will be carried externally on one of the aircraft's hard points.

Propulsion And Fuel System
The JF-17 is powered by a single Russian RD-93 turbofan engine, which is a variant of the RD-33 engine used on the Mig-29 fighter. The engine gives more thrust and significantly lower specific fuel consumption than the turbojet engines fitted to older combat aircraft being replaced by the JF-17. The advantages of using only one engine are that both maintenance time and cost are significantly lower than twin-engine fighters. A thrust-to-weight ratio of 0.99 can be achieved, with full internal fuel tanks and no external payload. The engine's air supply is provided by two bifurcated air inlets. However the RD-93 is known to produce smoke trails.

JF-17 can be armed with up to 3,629 kg (8,000 lb) of air-to-air and air-to-ground weaponry, as well as other equipment, mounted externally on the aircraft's seven hard points. One hard point is located under the fuselage between the main landing gear, two are underneath each wing and one at each wing-tip. All 7 hard points communicate via a MIL-STD-1760 data-bus architecture with the Stores Management System, which is stated to be capable of integration with weaponry of any origin. Internal armament comprises one 23 mm GSh-23-2 twin-barrel cannon mounted under the port side air intake, which can be replaced with a 30 mm GSh-30-2 twin-barrel cannon.
Simulator Of JF-17 Thunder Of Pakistan Airforce (PAF)
Simulator Of JF-17 Thunder Of Pakistan Airforce (PAF)
Active radar homing BVR AAMs can be deployed once integrated with the on-board radar and data-link for mid-course updates. The Chinese PL-12/SD-10 is expected to be the aircraft's primary BVR air-to-air weapon, although this may change if radars of other origin are fitted. Short range infra-red homing missiles currently integrated include the Chinese PL-5E and PL-9C, as well as the AIM-9L. The PAKISTAN AIR FORCE is also seeking to arm the JF-17 with a modern fifth generation close-combat missile such as the IRIS-T or A-darter. These will be integrated with the HMS/D as well as the radar for targeting.

Specifications Of JF-17 Thunder Aircraft Of Pakistan Air Force
Data from Pakistan Aeronautical Complex.

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 14.93 m (49 ft)
  • Wingspan: 9.45 m (31 ft, including 2 wingtip missiles)
  • Height: 4.72 m (15 ft 6 in)
  • Wing area: 24.4 m² (263 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 6,586 kg (14,520 lb)
  • Loaded weight: 9,100 kg (20,062 lb)
  • Useful load: 3000 kg (6600 lb)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 12,383 kg (27,300 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Klimov RD-93
  • Dry thrust: 49.4 kN / 51.2 kN (11,106 lbf / 11,510 lbf)
  • Thrust with afterburner: 84.5 kN (19,000 lbf)
  • G-limit: +8 g / -3 g
  • Internal Fuel Capacity: 2,300 kg (5,130 lb)


  • Maximum speed: Mach 1.6
  • Combat radius: 1,352 km (840 mi)
  • Ferry range: 3,482 km (1,880 NM)
  • Service ceiling: 16,920 m (55,500 ft)
  • Thrust/weight: 0.95 

  • Guns: 1× 23 mm GSh-23-2 twin-barrel cannon (can be replaced with 30 mm GSh-30-2)
  • Hardpoints: 7 in total (4× under-wing, 2× wing-tip, 1× under-fuselage; pylon stations number 3, 4 and 5 are wet-plumb capable) with a capacity of 3,629 kg (8,001 lb) for external fuel and ordnance

Air-to-air missiles:
  • MAA-1 Piranha (Short-range)
  • AIM-9L/M (Short-range)
  • PL-5EII (Short-range)
  • PL-9C (Short-range)
  • PL-12 / SD-10 (Beyond visual range)]
  • Air-to-surface missiles:
  • MAR-1 (Anti-radiation missile)
  • C-802A (Anti-ship missiles)
  • C-803 (Anti-ship missiles)
  • CM-400AKG (Hypersonic Anti-ship missiles)
  • Ra'ad ALCM (Nuclear capable Stealth Cruise missile)

Unguided bombs:
  • Mk-82 (general purpose bomb)
  • Mk-84 (general purpose bomb)
  • Matra Durandal (anti-runway bomb)
  • CBU-100/Mk-20 Rockeye (anti-armor cluster bomb)

Precision guided munitions (PGM):
  • GBU-10 (Laser-guided)
  • GBU-12 (Laser-guided)
  • LT-2 (Laser-guided)
  • H-2 (electro-optically guided)
  • H-4 (electro-optically guided)
  • LS-6 (satellite-guided glide bombs)
  • Satellite-guided bombs

  • Countermeasures (Flares, Chaff)
  • Up to 3 external drop tanks (2× under-wing 1,100 liters (240 imp gal; 290 US gal), 1× under-fuselage 800 liters (180 imp gal; 210 US gal)) for extended range/loitering time


  • DEEC electronic warfare suite
  • NRIET KLJ-7 multi-mode fire-control radar
  • Night vision goggles (NVG) compatible glass cockpit
  • Helmet Mounted Sights/Display (HMS/D)
Externally mounted avionics pods:
  • KG-300G self-protection radar jamming pod
  • WMD-7 day/night targeting pod